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  1. Aerial is standard for cars that came with a factory fitted sat-nav.
    2 points
  2. Its about time i posted an update on this. Since the last post the following has happened: The old CV have been replaced with new SKF items, the quality seems pretty decent so hopefully will last a year or two between getting replace. I have had some plates made up to strengthen some Febi lower arms, whilst seam welding and strengthening as per the lupo cup cars, hopefully this will stop this type of failure in the future. I have also fitted a front anti roll bar from a stock lupo, 18mm i think, the 22mm bar from the gti felt too stiff and was quite understeery, i liked the feeling of no from arb but after seeing this picture realise i needed to sort out the roll. Some new wilwoods were fitted, this option let me change some spacers if i want to run 14's for dirt rallys, not convinced on the pedal feel yet but we shall see. I 3D printed some brake ducts aswell and painted these to try and keep brake temps down, a lick of paint and i think they look acceptable. I have done a sprint, autotest, a hill climb and a dirt rally since and the car has been brilliant and very competitive, i even managed to get a fastest stage time at the dirt rally against some faster cars.
    2 points
  3. mk2 Thank you for your answer! I have read something about that glutous mixture here somewhere here in the topic of clutch... The conclusion seems to be correct: the mixture clogs the splinter axle. I understand this. Having read about these symptoms I tried to check the cover plate with the spring. It is outside the working environment and engaged by the lever. No bearing and no splinter axle resistance. On the polish fb mechanics group they told me that proper force is 100 till 140 kg. Mine is in the normal range. >A new clutch needs about 200N (~20kg) of force to operate at the pedal. YT mechanic measured 24 lb (12, 5 kg) at the pedal. I had so much more than 12-20 kg at the pedal! (I have driven several cars, and this one had the hardest clutch. Easily 40kg.) Do you think that this failure is due to the strong force on the spring + friction force? My dillema: if clutch cover functions within the range - should I change it? Will I get the easier, lighter new cluthch cover? (I doubt it). I attach pictures from checking the clutch cover force. The lever presses the clutch, reaching 100 kg easily., maitaining disengaged at 80 kg.
    2 points
  4. This is a known problem. It is caused by a mixture of clutch dust and gear oil, which creates a sticky, glue like substance. It sticks to the outside of the clutch release bearing spacer tube, and prevents the release bearing from sliding up and down easily. It should be dry. Yes, it creates a huge force. A new clutch needs about 200N (~20kg) of force to operate at the pedal. It is unrelated to the gearbox itself, but indicates that there is a leak on the input shaft seal. Now that the gearbox is out, it makes sense to change all the bearings and seals πŸ‘πŸ» Lots of pics please
    2 points
  5. If you wanted to use picture b (better imo) then you'd only have to change the shifter to a 6n polo one or something similar.
    1 point
  6. Just remove the end cover and replace 5th speed, turns out it is not hard and you dont even need to remove gearbox. Sadly a lot of 085’s just have problems with reduction ratio not only 5th gear. 3,875 is good for final drive and 0,74 is good for 5th speed. ESY has 4,063 final drive and 0,892 5th speed. Therefore you can simply change 5th speed with better ratios. These gearboxes are swapable only if there are screw holes for cable shifter, therefore you can use only gearboxes from cars with cable shifters originally. You can switch from A to B but not otherwise. But you can use 5th speed gears from all 085 gearboxes which are designed for 2,7liters of oil.
    1 point
  7. X4 N 106 403 01 (M12x1.5x100)
    1 point
  8. I'm thinking of selling my lupo, 54k miles uk car but it's silver I'm afraid... and I'm in North East Scotland...
    1 point
  9. I go ahead .... after a good month or so the engine is back in its place. I cleaned the area under the wipers, I then reassembled the pollen filter that I left sealed until I close everything by reassembling the ecu and levers of the wipers Before proceeding with the various connections I worked on the adapter for the oil sensor and pressure bulb for the future pressure gauge. Before re connect the the cooling circuit I replace the pipe on head for the heater core circuit All very tight, but luckily everything is ok and with no contact between the items Also I connected a large part of the electrical system not before having given a quick clean with the contact cleaner and then a fast air blown. My small diesel is almost fully connected
    1 point
  10. I go on with my mental troubles. πŸ€¦β€β™‚οΈ I'm waiting the heating core to reassemble the whole group and to re-connect easily the hydraulic circuit. Yesterday I received the dashboard to replace mine due to the partial detachment of the upholstery . Here mine with bubble. There's a premise to be made. Vw produced 4,805,900 golf mk3s and made a unique dashboard (indeed that of the golf mk 3.5 cabrio is fitted with P&P) They made 500,000 Lupo and made 3 or 4 different versions of the dashboard .... small but different ones ... .. which makes me smile mixed annoyed. In any case, I share the new hole in which I got myself into. Finding mine with the same code, unless spend between 150 and 190 euros for shipping only (for a total of 300 euros) was unthinkable. Found one on ebay at 43 euros, then taken from the spare parts website at 39 euros… .but with some differences The one above is mine First differences: My 2002 lupo has cup holder under central vent-din compartment The donor 1999 lupo (petrol) has mini console with buttons (hazard, defroster etc) Mine has a glove box. The 1999 donor has an open shelf. The difference is a central crosspiece on the subframe, the position of the holes we are identical My lupo also has an additional bracket for the glovebox. The donor does not have one. Notice the differences I started working Armed with Dremel I removed the crossbar and so far nothing complicated Another mod: remove the bracket from my ex and swap it to the "new"dash. It was heat-sealed .... so a little heat gun, and a metal blade for detachment .... but first I marked the position even if the assembly is quite straight fit. I Assembled, and i brutally fixed with 3 parker screws that are full ghost once assembled .... it all fits. The slightly more complicated part. Adapt and arrange the compartment for the mini console cup holder and objects. Here too dremel Once the console is right position with the dashboard, I have identified where to fix the staples. Once the entire lower part is assembled for final control, everything is good fit and looking good: all is solid and in its place. I would say that we fixed this too and finally no unwatchable bubble .... for the cost of 39 euros Another problem to fix: the "loving hands" who disassembled this 99 break the screw attachments of the air duct that connects to the heater unit. Damaged parts circled in red. I Disassembled (and luckily it disassembles well) the duct from my dash for replacement (after replacing all the foam around)
    1 point
  11. Remove the Flexi pipe then you can get the bottom bolt. Enjoy cleaning the inlet manifold, remember to clean the head as well.
    1 point
  12. A universal one like this: You will need small allen keys to fit. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/403596234739?_trkparms=ispr%3D1&hash=item5df835cff3:g:5jgAAOSwBhdiU5zw&amdata=enc%3AAQAGAAABACZ%2Bs%2BVhupqoIU7tgF1T%2FrXxhtJjcsfK4lKg%2FqOcq6KGk4SmmiA3d4JZYCKPJ%2FnsOEaAMwKnnoaB0XlhvKtSYAkaCkG%2BjQmvdUIdanisGmQ6rcgyv8IQVgipuDa98Hlm6v4o5bhrauLgJzWhoc0hVvpt%2B%2B46iIRqm9eo0fdAmUHAiuDTtzDW0Gk7v8II5M1O%2BX%2BxTtKYHYUhCky9TTEkNtl75qEKRf6NKpw7XK2MIJdLycpqldKaONypHArIMO6vHhjkUc%2FPHQ2tuHS15VcukGfgm1PHZiH%2F5yPUhXQxH60F6RshyvzpzZuZLT%2BxqamfSNO7y65YdW7F7y9o0iub5SM%3D|tkp%3ABFBM-qTO7JNg
    1 point
  13. Beautiful work πŸ‘πŸ» You have to write a how-to remove the dashboard, as you put it all back together again. OMG! It would help so many people... Great photos Put the 'how-to' in here- https://forums.clublupo.co.uk/index.php?/forum/23-the-archive-quothow-toquot-and-quotinformationquot/
    1 point
  14. I go on and as usual the works are chained, bringing to light the usual defects of vw. I Raised ABS pump for consequent raising of the gearbox engine mount bracket. My dashboard has a notorius defect: the coating has partially detached and has created unwatchable bubbles ... in the meantime as I write this, I have already found another dashboard With the dashboard down, i decided to prevent another problem, so I renew the heater core Another defect (like on golf Mk3) is the old sponge on the internal bulkhead So take it all down to clean and replace. Then I found a passage in the firewall to pass pipe for turbo pressure gauge and cable for oil pressure gauge sensor. Not to be cool or F&F, but the usual three gauges (turbo, oil pressure and voltmeter ) always help me to control and check the health of this little AMF I opened the heater unit, I cleaned all and with aluminum tape and cardboard I closed the holes and remade the new coating.
    1 point
  15. If you have the broken part removed, somewhere on part are always visible part number. You can see part number location in picture below, but its resolution is too low to read it. Just google the part number and buy new part, or ask your local store for this item.
    1 point
  16. Leather was a factory option, my GTI came with factory heated leather
    1 point
  17. Generic ones from e-bay worked for me as the OE are all flimsy.
    1 point
  18. Thank You both, this came out as a very interesting topic, and I also didnt know the wear limit, thats very useful information.
    1 point
  19. mk2 Thank you for your answer and recognition! I am an egineer, maybe for that reason the method is little more than guessing. I guess the additional friction resistance of the spline slider made the clutching work of the cluch literally "explosion of torque" from the rotation inertion due to the different rotation velocities: of engine and gearbox spline axle. The clutch is not worn out, because the clutching was done in small parts of a second so this was a easy task. But for the gearbox it was not. The kicking violently the gearwheels made them first weakend, then dead. Now I have dead gearbox, not spinning the axle in some gear positions. Concrete stop. As concrete poured into and dried. My consideration is to exchange the gearbox (with one with other gear ratio to move faster) and to have a clutch assembly so healthy to not to spoil that newly exchanged gearbox again. Now I have no clue if my cluthch - although "normal" is healthy?
    1 point
  20. I like your scientific methodπŸ‘πŸ» I once had the same problem on one of my Lupos. At the pedal it was so stiff/hard to disengage I thought the clutch cable was going to snap (or the pedal box break). It also was that sticky residue on the inside of the release bearing... The clutch diaphram spring only needs to pop in and out. If it works, then it is ok. The force isn't really that important as the engine torque is quite low in our Lupos. Just check where the release bearing contacts on the spring centre; The wear limit is half the thickness of the metal. So 1/2mm groove is ok... use a tiny amount of MS3 (CV joint) grease.
    1 point
  21. I once watched someone externally paint a senator bonnet. Exceptional amount of flies that day.
    1 point
  22. first show with the lupo won best effort πŸ€™πŸ»πŸ’š
    1 point
  23. Well I’ve just replaced my 109 as it conked everywhere and was dangerously inconvenient. Mine went so hot you couldn’t touch it but the new one runs lukewarm only. As for your other symptoms I’m not able to tell
    1 point
  24. Also if your gearbox does fit (which i suspect it would but not 100%) a 1l gearbox you'd have decent acceleration but you'd have absolutely no top end, you'll just blow your box to bits if you give it some welly.
    1 point
  25. you'll probably be best with a donor car. but you've got to weigh up the pro's and cons for it really, cost of a donor car (maybe 3-400 at a push if you find a rough one, then all the effort of swapping it over, then the need for modified insurance (plenty of companies about, greenlight, brentacre, adrian flux etc) whereas you might just be easier buying a 1.4 in the first place. Would be understandable if you wanted to go for a 6n2 GTi engine swap or a lupo gti motor swap, or even 1.8T (with a hell of a lot more work involved) as they didn't do a non GTi with the 1.6 and certainly didn't do a 1.8T, but IMO it just isn't worth doing a 1.0 to a 1.4.
    1 point
  26. When you raise the engine to give you a bit more ground clearance, I think the only bit you have to watch is the cam belt cover. You're gonna have to reassemble the entire front end just to check the bonnet clearance. I'd go for minimum 10mm. Maybe 15...?πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™€οΈ You'll need to raise the gearbox by the same amount. I don't think raising it by 30mm will affect anything else, like coolant hoses, air ducting, exhaust or gearshift mech. Maybe 40mm? Looking good πŸ‘πŸ»
    1 point
  27. Seems Franklin has developed an exhaust leak. He is sounding a bit like a tractor these days so I need to get him up in the air to see what the problem is.
    1 point
  28. Pic would help, but sounds a bit like a mk1 golf cable...? I recently refurbed the box on one of my SDIs and also had a very stiff or heavy clutch. I can conclusively say that the heaviness comes from friction between the guide sleeve and the release bearing. It looks like what happened was that gunge built up in the small gaps between the steel sleeve (attached to the gearbox with 3 bolts) and the inner plastic part of the releaser. ALL the clutch components were absolutely fine. Just gunge. The friction material dust from the clutch plate has to go somewhere, and if everything is nice and dry, it eventually gets blown out through gaps in the bellhousing. No problem. But what I'd noticed is that the primary input shaft seal, which is meant to keep the gear oil inside the gearbox, starts to weep very slightly as it gets old. The rotary action of the spinning shaft or maybe just capilary action allows a very small amount of oil to build up around the guide sleeve. Some of that oil makes its way between the sleeve and the releaser which naturally starts to collect clutch dust. Which then turns into really thick sticky gunge. The gunge has properties best described as very thick sticky toffee like tar, with fine grit in. Such a high viscosity substance between the sleeve and releaser simply jams the action, resulting in a heavy clutch. It doesn't help that the clutch release bearing lever that presses against the springs moves in an arc, which naturally tries to twist the release bearing when you put your foot on it. When you release, it gets pushed straight back by the springs, so engaging is not a problem- only releasing... so my guess is that fine metal in your gearbox oil has worn the seal, which is weeping, collecting dust and causing the releaser to be sticky.
    1 point
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